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Biotech Research


13 Life Science Blogs To Follow

   by BiopharmaTrend    7630
13 Life Science Blogs To Follow

We have decided to summarize a list of niche blogs, mostly personal, run by the Life Science professionals - scientists, business leaders. Such blogs often provide personalized insights into certain areas of drug discovery, biotech, and business, which are not properly covered by the mainstream media, or covered in very general strokes. Reading blogs is a great way to explore nuances of the industry -- through the prism of personal opinions and experiences of the authors. 

(Blogs are listed in alphabetical order).

11 Inspiring Women Advancing Artificial Intelligence In Life Sciences

   by BiopharmaTrend    3340
11 Inspiring Women Advancing Artificial Intelligence In Life Sciences

In this post, we decided to highlight eleven entrepreneurial women, leading the way in applying advanced computational technologies, such as machine learning (ML), deep learning (DL), and other artificial intelligence (AI) components, for tackling some of the hardest challenges of science -- in drug discovery and healthcare. This list is composed in alphabetical order. 

Synonymous Mutations Can Affect Protein Folding And Impair Cellular Fitness

   by Ellen Burns    349
Synonymous Mutations Can Affect Protein Folding And Impair Cellular Fitness

Synonymous codon substitutions affect the mRNA coding sequence, but the encoded amino acid sequence remains unchanged. Therefore, ostensibly these substitutions do not affect the phenotype and are often ignored in the study of human genetic variation. However, a variety of studies have shown that protein levels, translational accuracy, secretory efficiency, final folding structure and post-translational modifications are regulated by multiple mechanisms.

Synonymous codon action has gradually emerged, and the precise mechanism has yet to be discovered. Studies on the interference of synonymous codon substitution on the co-translational folding mechanism often lack in vivo evidence, and usually, rare synonymous codons tend to translate more slowly than ordinary synonymous codons. In addition, rare synonymous codons tend to appear in clusters, many of which are preserved during evolutionary history. The folding rates of many protein secondary and tertiary structures are similar to their synthesis rates, and subtle changes in elongation may also alter the folding mechanism.

Theoretically, synonymous rare codon substitutions reduce translational elongation and can provide more time for the N-terminal portion of the nascent protein to form a stable tertiary structure before the C-terminal portion emerges from the ribosome exit tunnel. Is the extra time good or bad for efficient folding? Cells contain a chaperone network to facilitate protein folding. It is unclear whether altered elongation and co-translational folding mechanisms of synonymous codons interfere with chaperone function.