BiopharmaTrend.com

A fresh viewpoint on drug discovery, pharma, and biotech

Become an author | Log in

Featured Research

New ideas and innovations in drug discovery

A Clear Example of AI Value For Drug Discovery Has Arrived

   by Andrii Buvailo    300
A Clear Example of AI Value For Drug Discovery Has Arrived

With all the hot discussions (for instance, here, here, here and here) going on right now among medicinal chemists, pharmaceutical researchers, and data scientists as to what artificial intelligence (AI) means for the future of drug discovery, the life science world has divided into “AI-believers”, “AI-atheists”, and “AI-agnostics”.

It is useless to repeat what has been many times said about successes of AI in areas like natural language processing, image processing, pattern recognition and self-driving cars (here is the summary), but few of us knew if those sort of results (or any meaningful results at all) could possibly be achieved with such complex systems as biological organisms… Finally, however, a hint of hope arrived.   

Outsourcing AI For Drug Discovery: Independent Expertise Is Key To Avoid Overhyped Claims

   by Mostapha Benhenda    1681
Outsourcing AI For Drug Discovery: Independent Expertise Is Key To Avoid Overhyped Claims

Investments in artificial intelligence (AI) for drug discovery are surging. Big Pharmas are throwing big bucks at AI. Sanofi signed a 300 Million dollars deal with the Scottish AI startup Exscentia, and GSK did the same for 42 Million dollars. Also, the Silicon Valley VC firm Andreessen Horowitz launched a new 450 Million dollars bio investment fund, with one focus area in applications of AI to drug discovery.

In this craze, lots of pharma and biotech decision-makers wonder whether they should jump on the bandwagon, or wait and see.

Unveiling Hidden Drug Targets

   by Andrii Buvailo    2668
Unveiling Hidden Drug Targets

Scientists estimated that the human genome encodes above 20,000 different proteins in our body. However, available public databases contain records of known ligands for only about 10% of all proteins. Expanding the map of “druggable” proteins increases the chances of running into novel small molecule drugs.

A recent study, published in Cell, opens doors for unveiling novel drug targets and even reconsidering some of the known protein targets, previously tagged “undruggable”.

Learning From Nature: New Antibiotics Found In Our Body

   by Andrii Buvailo    1159
Learning From Nature: New Antibiotics Found In Our Body

To date, nature has been the best teacher for drug discovery scientists, especially for those who develop antimicrobial drugs. Lately, a new example proving this notion emerged in press - a recent publication in a prestigious research journal Nature describing a new powerful method of identifying yet unknown classes of antibiotics by learning from bacteria living in our body - microbiota.

Further Reading