Andrii Buvailo

Co-founder and Editor-in-Chief

Andrii Buvailo is a pharmaceutical industry analyst and writer, focusing on emerging companies (startups), technologies and trends in drug discovery, as well as R&D outsourcing. His articles were published on Forbes.com, and market research reports were referenced by some of the leading life science organizations.

Andrii is a Director of Ecommerce at Enamine Ltd -- a global supplier of fine chemicals and contract research services for the pharmaceutical industry. In this role he is involved in IT-management (ecommerce applications and systems), sales management and marketing activities, related to supporting drug discovery organizations across the globe with innovative chemicals and research services. Apart from his role at Enamine, he oversees BiopharmaTrend.com, and industry analytics consultancy.

He received a master's degree in Inorganic Chemistry and a PhD in Physical Chemistry from Kyiv National Taras Shevchenko University. He spent a year at Prof. Eric Borguet Group at Temple University Department of Chemistry developing gas sensor and biosensor systems, He also participated in numerous scientific projects in Ukraine, Belgium, and Germany (DAAD, Horizon 2020, NATO, CRDF grants), and published in high-impact research journals. Andrii has hands-on experience in structural and coordination chemistry, surface science, physical chemistry, nanomaterials and gas sensors, as well as bioinorganic chemistry. He received extensive theoretical training in molecular biology, medicinal chemistry, and computer-aided drug discovery.

   

Selected posts from Editor

FDA Analysis of Antibiotic Development - with Hubris!

(This post originally appeared on David Shlaes's personal blog)
 
The US FDA just published an analysis of antibiotic development looking back over the last 40 years. The paper was accompanied by an editorial by Rex and Outterson. These papers are well worth reading and I highly recommend them for everyone whether they are familiar with antibiotic development or not. I must say that the hubris of the FDA analysis is astounding (see below). 

Coronavirus - My Secret Hope

Coronaviruses are a large family of viruses that cause disease in animals and humans. They were discovered as a cause of the common cold more than 50 years ago. In some studies, up to 30% of colds in children and adults were caused by these viruses. Coronavirus colds, in temperate climes, have a clear seasonality with a preference for the winter months (Figure below). They occur more sporadically in tropical climates, but there they seem to prefer spring and fall.

CF = complement-fixing antibody

Antibiotic Research and Development - Public vs. Private Funding

Over the past decade, pull incentives as a solution to the broken antibiotic market have been proposed to entice companies into antibiotic research and development.  These incentives would essentially provide a market, and therefore a return on investment for pharmaceutical companies. Almost all of today’s inadequate antibiotic pipeline is provided by biotech and small pharma.  All are threatened with loss of investor interest because of the failed marketplace and many are experiencing difficulty in raising funds either from public or private markets.  One alternative to providing money to the “evil” pharmaceutical industry via a substantial pull incentive is to create publicly funded non-profit organizations or public-private ventures that would essentially replace the industry in antibiotic research, development and commercialization. Two proponents of this approach are Lord Jim O’Neill (of the O’Neill Commission or Antimicrobial Resistance Review fame) and Ramanan Laxminarayan of the Center for Disease Dynamics, Economics and Policy and of GARDP. Both, clearly, are key thought leaders in the area. 

Will 2019 Bring Positive Signals for the Declining Antibiotics R&D Market?

Antibiotic R&D has had a particularly bad year starting with The Medicines Company who abandoned their antibiotic R&D efforts and sold their antibiotic assets to Melinta late last year right after getting approval for vabomere. This year both Sanofi and Novartis abandoned their antibiotic R&D efforts and divested their clinical and preclinical assets. Allergan, holder of the North American rights to ceftaroline, dalbavancin and ceftazidime-avibactam, also announced that they would divest their antibiotic assets. I have not heard that they were successful. Achaogen has now undergone two efforts at “restructuring” involving virtually eliminating all R&D and has essentially put up the “for sale” sign just after achieving approval for plazomicin. Finally, Melinta abandoned their antibiotic R&D efforts in the face of miserable sales of their recently launched antibiotics including delafloxacin and vabomere.